This Enid News & Eagle began this award-winning series in 2015 and continues to explore the science behind efforts in determining why there was a sudden upswing in earthquakes in the Sooner State beginning in 2009 and the ever-evolving problem facing Oklahomans as they continue to occur.

While Oklahoma’s earthquake rates are down compared to 2015, officials cannot say for sure if the decline is permanent.

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Insurers are boosting the cost of earthquake coverage anywhere from 4 to 300 percent depending on the policy, as they brace for a catastrophic quake, state officials said during a meeting Tuesday.

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When the U.S. Geological Survey released maps on Monday displaying hazards for both natural and human-induced earthquakes, we were troubled to see Oklahoma on that map looking as bad or worse than California.

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FAIRVIEW — Oklahoma’s red-dirt scenery received a new addition about 21 miles northwest of Fairview on Tuesday morning.

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The plans to auction several hundred acres around and under Lake Lewisville, about 35 miles northwest of Dallas, threaten both drinking water for about 2 million consumers and the integrity of the earthen dam that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers consider the nation’s eighth-most-hazardous, local officials and environmental groups say.

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One of the largest earthquakes recorded in Northwest Oklahoma history struck Saturday morning.

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SandRidge Energy and the Oklahoma Corporation Commission's Oil and Gas Conservation Division reached an agreement Thursday regarding wells in the Medford, Cherokee and Byron areas.

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"A lot of people say we just need the earth to stop shaking, and I understand that, but the fact of the matter is that without the ability to dispose of wastewater, we cannot produce oil and gas in the state of Oklahoma, and this is our lifeblood." — Kim Hatfield

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Oklahoma Corporation Commission is directing the following wells in the Fairview area to reduce volume following recent earthquakes. Most of the wells were shut down because of weather events between Thanksgiving 2015 and the first of the year.

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The Great ShakeOut, an annual international earthquake drill and information source, offers tips on how to survive an earthquake. 

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With the USGS reporting factors aligning for Oklahoma to have another magnitude 5.7 or greater earthquake, getting the very best answers possible on the causes and solutions is critical for our state.

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In an earlier editorial, we called for clarification and urged Oklahoma insurance companies to provide details of homeowner coverage regarding earthquake damage within days of purchasing a policy.

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The bill would have mandated an insurance company to provide earthquake insurance, details of the coverage — including cost and a list of what was, and was not, covered — within 10 days of purchasing a policy.

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Senate Bill 809 allows municipalities to set regulations on oil and gas exploration as long as such regulations are “reasonable ordinances.” Muni­cipalities are not allowed to ban oil and drilling exploration under the law.

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This interactive graphic shows campaign contributions from oil, gas and energy companies, or individuals, that deal with oil exploration and d…

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ENID, Okla. — How many earthquakes have occurred in Oklahoma this year?

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Since the Pennsylvanian and Permian periods, there has been little tectonic activity in Oklahoma, according to Oklahoma Historical Society. The Meers Fault, in southwestern Oklahoma, is the lone exception.

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89 updates to this series since