theadanews.com - Ada, Oklahoma

Local News

February 23, 2013

Retiring councilman sees progress

Ada —  

I want to thank the voters of Ada for trusting me to serve on the Ada City Council for the last six years.  It has been my honor.  I considered another term, however, I found someone willing and very, very able to represent Ward 1 and the entire community. Also, I feel very optimistic about the direction of the city.

There has been a lot of progress in the last few years that will become more visible to Ada residents in the near future.

New police and fire stations, recreation facilities, Main Street upgrade, overall street improvement, and a new water tower will join a new county jail and remodeled courthouse, Ada Arts District, East Central University improvements and the Chickasaw Nation Medical Center.  

Less obvious to the average citizen are many of the infrastructure improvements, needs, and plans. The city of Ada has been upgrading the sewage collection system for several years, and major improvements to that treatment plant, as well as water treatment and delivery systems, are underway and/or planned.

 None of the accomplishments or plans above would be possible or of consequence without a sufficient, safe, reliable, and affordable source of water.  Fortunately, Ada has a water supply that is the envy of water providers everywhere.  Unfortunately, a sign of the times is that if you have a good water supply, someone else is going to want it.  That was the case in 2003 when a group of cities in the Oklahoma City area proposed to build a 90-mile pipeline to the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer and pump over 70 million gallons of water per day to those cities. Citizens and communities across south-central Oklahoma, such as Ada, Ardmore, Durant, Davis, Sulphur, and Tishomingo, that depend on this aquifer for drinking water and economic development for almost 150,000 residents, joined together with the Chickasaw Nation to convince the state Legislature to pass Senate Bill 288. SB 288 prohibited export of Arbuckle-Simpson water out of this seven-county region until a hydrology study could determine how much water could be safely pumped from the aquifer without destroying the water supplies of current users.

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