theadanews.com - Ada, Oklahoma

Health and Medicine

October 19, 2012

With juices, calories can outweigh benefits for children

(Continued)

Mirza agrees, saying that parents have an important role in helping develop their children's taste buds.

"Once you have introduced sweet drinks, that is what children will want," she says.

But if you still feel strongly about giving your children fruit juice, the recommendation is to stick with four daily ounces for children ages 1 to 6 and eight daily ounces for children ages 7 and older.

And if you are going with 100 percent fruit juice, go for a calcium-fortified orange juice instead of apple juice, Glazer says.

Ciuba, who has a 7-year-old and a 4-year-old, says at home she serves water with a splash of cranberry juice. She just doesn't really see a case for 100 percent fruit juice — for anyone, adult or child.

"I would say eat your fruit, don't drink it, whenever possible."

BETTER: Fruit is lower on calories and higher on fiber, which makes you feel fuller.

WORSE: Fruit juice is packed with calories and sugar and won't make you feel full.

---

Boston is a fitness trainer and freelance writer.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Health and Medicine
AP Video
US Ready to Slap New Sanctions on Russia Kerry: Not Worried About Israeli Criticism Boater Rescued From Edge of Kentucky Dam Girl Struck by Plane on Florida Beach Dies Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre House to Vote on Slimmed-down Bill for Border Looming Demand Could Undercut Flight Safety Raw: 2 Shells Hit Fuel Tank at Gaza Power Plant Raw: Massive Explosions From Airstrikes in Gaza Giant Ketchup Bottle Water Tower Up for Sale Easier Nuclear Construction Promises Fall Short Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue Raw: Corruption Trial Begins for Former Va Gov. The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating
Stocks
Poll

Are you pleased that Oklahoma has repealed Common Core standards for public school students?

Yes
No
     View Results