theadanews.com - Ada, Oklahoma

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July 25, 2013

Rural Oklahoma to benefit from OCAN

Ada —

A new program that expands rural access to broadband Internet service will benefit Oklahoma schools, hospitals and tribes, Rep. Todd Thomsen said Wednesday.

“With the technology world that we live in, better connectivity will always improve the way people function and are able to utilize the technology,” he said.

State and local officials hailed the completion this week of the Oklahoma Community Anchor Network, which is designed to bring broadband Internet access to rural Oklahoma communities. The project is a joint venture of the Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services, the Oklahoma Department of Transportation and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education’s OneNet division — the state’s telecommunications network for government and education.

The state received a $74 million grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration for the project.

Several state agencies already operate broadband networks, but the OCAN project brings those agencies together to form a new network that will serve Oklahoma’s rural communities, according to a news release from the Regents.

OCAN’s expanded broadband network covers 1,005 miles and reaches 35 counties, according to the Regents. The network links 33 “community anchors” across the state, including East Central University and the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training in Ada, to the state’s existing networks.

ECU officials were pleased that the college was chosen as a community anchor for the project, which will benefit the college and rural Oklahoma alike, said President John Hargrave.

“We have many students from rural areas,” he said in a comment provided by OneNet. “They should benefit from this enhanced technology, which in turn aids in the pursuit of obtaining a higher education degree.”

 

Partnerships

After the OCAN network goes online Aug. 1, state officials are hoping to form partnerships with local telecommunications companies to help rural communities. Those companies would use the new network to provide broadband service to rural Oklahomans who haven’t had access to high-speed Internet in the past.

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