theadanews.com - Ada, Oklahoma

October 9, 2012

Inhofe vs. climate change

Lone Beasley Publisher adanewspublisher@cableone.net
The Ada News

Ada —  

One thing you can say about Oklahoma’s U.S. senators — they don’t particularly give a hang about what anyone thinks of them.

Sen. Tom Coburn told voters he wasn’t going to Washington to “bring back the bacon,” but to try to restore fiscal sanity to our national government. He has nearly gone hoarse in the attempt. Only now are people beginning to really listen.

Similarly, Sen. Jim Inhofe couldn't care less what the prevailing thought is regarding climate change.

He has been swimming against the rushing stream for years in his fight against it. Likewise, people are finally beginning to listen.

Before opening Inhofe’s book on the subject, The Greatest Hoax — How the Global Warming Conspiracy Threatens Your Future, I had some preconceived ideas of how his presentation would be laid out. I thought it would be based on his private thoughts on the matter.

Instead, what I found was some eye-opening evidence. His first target is the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the body responsible for much of the global warming hysteria. The IPCC’s studies are assembled by scientists. Inhofe says journalists never take the time to read the report, only its summary.

The problem is the summary is written by bureaucrats, not scientists. Chapter 8 of a 1996 IPCC report, written by scientists, says, “No study to date has positively attributed all or part (of the climate change observed) to anthropogenic causes.” Anthropogenic is a fancy way of saying “human.” Yet the Summary for Policymakers retooled the findings to say, “The balance of evidence suggests that there is a discernible human influence on global climate.”

Inhofe says Dr. Michael Mann’s claims that temperatures in the Northern hemisphere remained relatively stable over 900 years and then spiked upward in the twentieth century have been totally debunked by other scientists who have examined his research.

 Michael Crichton, Inhofe says, was more than a fiction writer. He was a scientist and a medical doctor who held degrees from Harvard College and Harvard Medical School. He was a visiting lecturer in physical anthropology at Cambridge University and a postdoctoral fellow at the Salk Institute. Dr. Crichton set out to write a frightening book on global warming and, after extensively researching the subject, completely changed its tone. State of Fear instead lavishes attention on the political scare tactics and flimsy science that make up the movement.

Crichton, you might remember, publicly said climate change alarmist Al Gore was wrong.

And speaking of Gore, Inhofe relates an incident in which he pointedly asked the former vice president if he was willing to do what his movie, An Inconvenient Truth, asked of its patrons. In other words, would Al Gore change the way he lives?

Inhofe says Gore’s eventual answer was, “No.”

This hypocrisy is perhaps the most galling part of the hysteria surrounding the issue. Gore and his host of Hollywood acolytes are not about to give up their standards of living. They just want you and me to surrender ours.