News this month has been dominated by the massive storms that have roared out of the Atlantic to threaten the United States. First came Hurricane Harvey, which brought devastation to Texas. Then Hurricane Irmarampaged through the Caribbean before slamming into Florida. So it is understandable that Americans might feel a certain weariness about storms. But it is important that the destruction and pain being experienced by our compatriots in Puerto Rico not be ignored or overlooked.

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The massive storm packed 60-mile-per-hour winds and even more powerful gusts. Those winds stretched out more than 400 miles beyond the storm’s center, enveloping the entire state. Three people were killed in Georgia.

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Last year, Dolly Parton set up a foundation to help people who lost their homes in the wildfires that ravaged Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and her beloved Smokey Mountains. Her charity has already handed out $9 million to the fire victims. But now, five people have been indicted after being caught in an elaborate scheme to allegedly defraud the charity of monies intended for real victims.

WASHINGTON - The question of whether flushable wipes - used by potty-training toddlers and people looking beyond traditional toilet paper - are clogging sewer systems will be hashed out in federal court, where a manufacturer has sued the District of Columbia over a new city law regulating when such wipes can be labeled "flushable."

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Officials in Quinlan, Texas, said the woman was attending a Sept. 8 football game at Hobart Lytal Memorial stadium when several members of the crowd made school administration aware of her t-shirt. Officials called the t-shirt "offensive, portraying violence, and threatening."

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Perhaps an unlikely candidate to spur such a momentous movement, Father Stanley Rother, a humble priest from the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City who was murdered in Guatemala in 1981, will be one step closer to that status on September 23 during his beatification, a Catholic Church blessing process that recognizes a dead individual's entrance into heaven and lets devotees pray to that person for protection.

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Only four games involving Big 12 teams are on tap this week, with No. 16 TCU’s visit to No. 6 Oklahoma State rightly garnering the most attention.

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They're supposed to be the nine most closely guarded numbers in your life. But with an ever-growing number of companies asking for Social Security numbers - and then hit by cyber breaches exposing them - experts say the Social Security number is clearly a flawed way to accurately identify someone.

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Hurricane Maria delivered a destructive full-body blow to this U.S. territory on Wednesday, ripping off metal roofs, generating terrifying and potentially lethal flash floods, knocking out 100 percent of the island's electrical grid, and decimating some communities.

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WASHINGTON — As Senate Republicans make a final stab this year at undoing former President Barack Obama's health care law, health care advocates are urging their legislators to vote against the measure.“We believe in protecting our neighbor,” said Perry Bryant, president of West Virginians for Affordable Health Care.Alarmed by an independent estimate the bill would cost the state $1 billion in funding used to help hundreds of thousands afford medical coverage, Bryant urged Sen. Shelley Moore Capito “not to vote as a partisan politician in D.C.”Republican leaders are hoping a different approach and the urgency of following through on campaign promises will this time muster enough votes to get rid of the controversial law.However, they face some of the same obstacles as in July, when their effort fell a vote short.GOP senators from states like West Virginia and Ohio — where Medicaid coverage was expanded to more people — face the prospect of supporting the loss of millions of dollars that help people afford medical coverage. Republican governors from those states, like Massachusetts' Charlie Baker and Ohio's John Kasich, are opposing the bill.Health care advocacy groups representing doctors and hospitals, along with the AARP, say allowing states to undo the law's regulations would again allow insurers to charge older people and those with medical conditions higher premiums.

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Equifax could get away with paying a mere $1 per person after failing to protect almost half of America's credit data.

While the 118-year-old credit-reporting firm has been hit with more than 100 consumer lawsuits over its massive security breach, legal experts say there's room for a deal because neither side has a slam-dunk case.

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Hurricane Maria roared ashore on Puerto Rico on Wednesday as the strongest storm to strike the island in more than 80 years while panicked residents fled to high ground and huddled in shelters hoping to withstand powerhouse winds that have already left death and devastation across the Caribbean.

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AUSTIN — Texas House Speaker Joe Straus won a number of high-profile legislative battles in this year, but fellow Republicans are now passing no-confidence resolutions aimed at removing him from his leadership role.

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Hurricane Maria with top winds of 120 miles (193 kilometers) per hour, was 60 miles east of Martinique and bearing down on Dominica and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean's Leeward Islands, the National Hurricane Center said in an 11 a.m. advisory.

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MoneyTips

Could your child have a credit report even if he or she has never used a credit card or borrowed money? It's possible when identity theft is involved.

Your child's Social Security number (SSN) may be exposed in a number of ways – school records and medical records are just two common examples. Any time your child's SSN is entered on a form and stored in a new location, one more avenue is established for identity thieves potentially to access the SSN. By pairing your child's valid SSN with a different birth date, thieves can open fraudulent accounts without your knowledge.

This type of fraud is particularly insidious because it can go undetected for many years. Potentially, you may not realize fraud has taken place until your child reaches early adulthood and applies for student loans, car loans, or other forms of credit. By then, the damage is extensive and difficult to repair.

Most parents wouldn't think to review their child's credit report. Unless ...

Young Americans Are Often Victims Of Identity Theft

Child Identity Theft 101

Tell Credit Bureaus When You Lose A Loved One

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A more expansive checkup is part of a pioneering effort in Vermont to keep people healthy while simplifying the typical jumble of private and public insurers that pays for health care. The underlying premise is simple: Reward doctors and hospitals financially when patients are healthy, not just when they come in sick.