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WASHINGTON - The Trump administration sought to block former acting attorney general Sally Yates from testifying in the House investigation of possible links between Russian officials and Donald Trump's campaign, according to letters provided to The Washington Post. The effort to keep Yates from testifying has further angered Democrats, who have accused Republicans of trying to damage the inquiry.

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WASHINGTON - Congress sent proposed legislation to President Donald Trump on Tuesday that wipes away landmark online privacy protections, the first salvo in what is likely to become a significant reworking of the rules governing Internet access in an era of Republican dominance.

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WASHINGTON - A government watchdog agency, the Government Accountability Office, has agreed to review the costs and security precautions associated with President Donald Trump's travel and stays at Mar-a-Lago after a request for inquiry from leading Democrats on Capitol Hill.

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Michigan and the city of Flint have agreed to spend the next several years replacing roughly 18,000 aging underground pipes as part of a far-reaching legal settlement over the city's ongoing crisis involving lead-tainted water.

WASHINGTON - The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee acknowledged Monday that he had made a secret visit to the White House last week to view intelligence files he then cited as proof of potentially improper spying activity against President Donald Trump, casting new doubt on the independence of a congressional investigation into Russian election interference.

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On the surface, unlimited vacation might seem like a radical idea. Only 1 to 2 percent of companies in corporate America offer the benefit, according to a report from the Society for Human Resource Management. Leaders at many companies that have adopted the policy praise the perk as a way of lifting morale among workers and purging the liabilities of paying for accrued vacation time. But others caution that it’s not for everyone.

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WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump plans to unveil a new White House office on Monday with sweeping authority to overhaul the federal bureaucracy and fulfill key campaign promises - such as reforming care for veterans and fighting opioid addiction - by harvesting ideas from the business world and, potentially, privatizing some government functions.

President Donald Trump cast blame Sunday for the collapse of his effort to overhaul the health-care system on conservative interest groups and far-right Republican lawmakers, shifting culpability to his own party after initially faulting Democratic intransigence.

Last year's earthshaking election brought new attention to rural America. This attention is overdue - rural America has long been largely ignored by reporters, researchers and policymakers - and much of it is useful, as this increasingly urban-centric country tries to understand and reconnect with those living far from cities.But so far, the narrative emerging about rural America has been woefully incomplete, because so much of the media coverage has focused on only one slice of it: rural white America. Some stories are clear about their scope: Their authors have intentionally chosen a particular geographic and racial population to explore and explain. Others are less obvious in their focus, though details - region of the country or photographs - soon make explicit what is merely implied or assumed. Either way, though, a particular racial narrative is being told.There's another rural America that exists beyond this rural white America. Nearly 10.3 million people, about one-fifth of rural residents, are people of color. Of this population, about 40 percent are African-American, 35 percent are nonwhite Hispanic, and the remaining 25 percent are Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander or multiracial. And this rural America is expected to grow in the coming decades, as rural areas see a rapid increase in Latino immigration.This rural America, much like rural white America, can be found from coast to coast. But these rural Americans tend to live in different places from rural whites: across the Mississippi Delta and the Deep South; throughout the Rio Grande Valley; on reservations and native lands in the Southwest, Great Plains and Northwest.This rural America has a different history from rural white America: a history of forced migration, enslavement and conquest. This rural America receives even lower pay and fewer protections for its labor than does rural white America. And, as my own research shows, this rural America attends very different schools than rural white America, schools that receive far less funding and other resources.In fact, the relationship between rural white communities and rural communities of color is much like the relationship between urban white communities and urban communities of color: separate and unequal.And it also appears that these rural Americans vote for different candidates than rural whites. A look at county-level voting and demographic data suggests that this rural America voted for Hillary Clinton.In defining rural white America as rural America, pundits, academics and lawmakers are perpetuating an incomplete and simplistic story about the many people who make up rural America and what they want and need. Ironically, this story - so often told by liberals trying to explain the recent rise in undisguised nativism and xenophobia - serves to re-privilege whiteness. Whiteness is assumed; other races are shoved even further to the margins.The erasure of rural communities of color has other, more immediate risks, too. As community and service organizations rush to temper the effects of recent immigration and voter-ID policies, they may focus on urban areas and overlook the rural populations - immigrants, refugees and black communities - also affected by this legislation. And as hopeful progressives market themselves in the run-up to midterm elections, they risk alienating their rural supporters: rural communities of color.Interest in rural America is welcome. But we need to make sure it is complete and inclusive - and genuine. We need to press the media for more balanced, more representative coverage of rural places and people. We need to push our politicians for legislation and programs that support rural communities of color. And we need to organize, building political coalitions that bridge lines of race and geography. - - -Tieken is an assistant professor of education at Bates College and author of "Why Rural Schools Matter."

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“Nothing is so beautiful as Spring,” exulted Gerard Manley Hopkins, a big fan of the season. He has plenty of company. The season of rebirth somehow manages to surprise and delight poets and just folks every year when it arrives.

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WASHINGTON – Shortly after Republican leaders pulled the vote on their bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, House Speaker Paul Ryan lamented that “moving from an opposition party to a governing party comes with growing pains and well, we’re feeling those pains today.”

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ATLANTA – A complex plan to connect investors with rural businesses striving to grow has run into resistance from some lawmakers wary of the potential cost to the state.

ALBANY -- Lawmakers and Gov. Andrew Cuomo are divided on several major issues in the drive for an on-time state budget, though an agreement is emerging for a $47 million infusion to boost the pay of direct-care aides for developmentally disabled people.

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WASHINGTON - In the eyes of former President Barack Obama's Justice Department, private prisons were a sort-of necessary evil - less safe and effective than facilities run by the government, but needed because of the volume of inmates in the federal system. When Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates ordered them to be phased out in favor of government-run facilities last year, she said she was able to do so only because the inmate population had declined, thanks to sentencing reform and other measures to keep people from serving long prison terms.

Thursday was supposed to be a glorious anniversary for President Donald Trump and the Republicans. Seven years after former president Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act, Republicans were poised to take the first concrete step toward repealing and replacing that law. Instead, Thursday produced an embarrassing setback that left the way forward far from certain.

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Telling others during our travels that we are from Georgia often results in someone mentioning they experienced an enjoyable visit to Savannah, Jekyll Island or St. Simons Island. These are trendy Georgia tourist destinations and all three could easily be visited during a single trip along Georgia’s 100-mile Atlantic coastline.

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WASHINGTON - The Republican health-care overhaul spearheaded by House Speaker Paul Ryan (Wis.) and backed by President Donald Trump hung in the balance Wednesday, as the White House signaled at the 11th hour a willingness to rework the measure to mollify conservatives.

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Although it is difficult to get exact numbers, some estimates show Immigration and Customs Enforcement home raids have never resulted in more than 30,000 apprehensions in any given year. At that rate, it could take 366 years for immigration agents to remove all 11 million undocumented migrants using home raids.