John Glenn, who captured the nation's attention in 1962 as the first American to orbit the Earth during a tense time when the United States sought supremacy over the Soviet Union in the space race, and who rocketed back into space 36 years later, becoming the oldest astronaut in history, died Dec. 8 at a hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Glenn, who in his post-NASA career served four terms as a U.S. senator from Ohio, was 95.

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WASHINGTON - The U.S. surgeon general on Thursday called the skyrocketing use of e-cigarettes among youth "a major public health concern," saying that although more research needs to be done on its potential harms, policymakers should take strong action to keep the products out of the hands of the nation's young people.

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Mankato Department of Public Safety call logs to East High School show 10 calls for disturbances, four for harassment, two for assaults and one for threats since the start of the school year, 17 calls in total. 

At West High School there have been two disturbance calls and one report each of assault, threats and harassment, 5 in total.

So the number of police calls at East is more than triple the calls at West. Both schools have a police liaison officers in house regularly.

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The bombing of Pearl Harbor was a pivotal moment in U.S. and world history. The attack thrust the U.S. into World War II and set in motion a series of events that would transform the country into a global superpower and guardian of international order. Seventy-five years later, this legacy of Pearl Harbor now faces perhaps its biggest challenge.

At their height, the pings and bells of pinball machines could be heard in arcades and pizza parlors across the country, offering an afternoon escape for teenagers and a consistently profitable investment for store owners. Unbeknownst to the two groups, their actions were illegal in many cities — including one in northern Indiana that is taking steps to reverse an arcane, unenforced law banning the amusement devices inside the city limits.

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TIFTON, Ga. — Online shopping is quick and convenient for those looking to buy holiday presents, but it does come with its own set of problems. Porch pirates is the name given to those who cruise along behind delivery trucks and steal packages from unattended porches. 

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WASHINGTON, D.C. - Hundreds of criminals sentenced by District of Columbia judges under an obscure local law crafted to give second chances to young adult offenders have gone on to rob, rape or kill residents of the nation's capital.

On Jan. 15, 1885, one man sat outside his house in the freezing cold with some black cloth, a turkey feather and a camera, ready to be the first person to catch a snowflake on film. Wilson Bentley was obsessed with snow, so much so that he did very little with his life other than photograph snow; he’s most likely where the idea that no two snowflakes are alike came from. He’d catch flakes on the cloth, manipulate them into position with the feather and quickly put them under the camera shutter. He took dozens of pictures and found that snowflakes came in all shapes and sizes. Bentley called them “masterpieces of design” – they’re not designed, but they are still some of the most magical structures on Earth.

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VALDOSTA, Ga. – A 3-year-old boy was in critical but stable condition Sunday morning after he was run over by a float at the Valdosta Christmas Parade Saturday night, police said.

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Since the 1950s, the U.S. government has helped kids and kids at heart follow Santa on his annual Christmas Eve trek across the globe. But how did the tradition of tracking Santa’s flight get started?

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The camera pans the classroom. The first close-up shows a girl in a purple headscarf. She is 10 years old, seated at a desk beside other fourth-graders. The American flag hangs near a bulletin board in the background. The girl rises, describing "the lie" she knows.

ALBANY -- An ethics rule advanced by Gov. Andrew Cuomo requiring all elected officials to disclose their personal incomes is meeting resistance outside the capital where critics question why small town leaders must pay for the sins of state officials.

WASHINGTON - The Justice Department on Wednesday unveiled a sweeping set of changes to the federal prison system - creating what it termed a "school district" for inmates, agreeing to pay for every inmate to get a birth certificate and state ID card, and mandating new standards for privately-run halfway houses.